Overview of Cialis

Cialis was developed through a collaboration between Eli Lilly, pharmaceutical giant, and Icos, a biotechnology company. The product, promising 36-hour relief of erectile dysfunction, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in late 2003. Cialis went head-to-head with competitors Viagra and Levitra to capture a hefty share of the market.

Cialis is in a class of drugs known as selective phosphodiesterase Type 5 inhibitors, or PDE-5s. Cialis works by inhibiting the phosphodiesterase enzyme. This enzyme affects the mechanism of muscle tissue relaxation and blood flow to the penis that is required for a normal erection. Cialis remains in the body for up to thirty-six hours. The benefit is that partners have more freedom with intimacy without feeling rushed.

Erectile dysfunction is understood to be a symptom of normal aging. However, medical practitioners are hoping more and more men are encouraged by the popularity of drug treatments like Cialis and will discuss their erectile dysfunction problems with their primary physicians. Erectile dysfunction can also be a symptom of diabetes, high blood pressure, prostate problems, hormone problems, and alcohol and drug abuse. Doctors and big pharmaceutical companies want to promote that aging and the common medical problems that accompany it do not mean a man cannot engage in healthy sexual activity.

Cialis gives men even more choices in erectile dysfunction therapy. In contrast to its foremost rival, Viagra, Cialis boasts fewer and less significant side effects, with the added benefit of being much longer-lasting. Fortunately, men can rejoice in this virtual sexual revolution unfolding before their eyes with such familiar names as Cialis, Viagra, and Levitra. These names dominate Super Bowl commercial time and mainstream media headlines.

Cialis’s popularity is not limited to American consumers. Erectile dysfunction has been shown to be suffered by hundreds of millions of men worldwide, and perhaps many more who still feel stigmatized by the condition. Just as American men are enjoying the freedom to try these new treatments, men around the world are also demanding drugs like Cialis. Unfortunately, the illegal drug trade is becoming infested with phony Cialis, Viagra, and Levitra. The names are so well known and in demand that it is suspected even terrorist organizations have been inspired to traffic fakes to profitable markets such as Europe and the United States.